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Kathryn Markel Fine Arts

529 W 20th St, Suite 6W, New York
212-366-5368
Tuesday - Friday 10am - 6pm, Saturday 11am - 6pm


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Echoes
Nov 30-Dec 23
ECHOES A Group Show November 30th December 23rd, 2017 NEW YORK, NYOctober 3rd, 2017 Kathryn Markel Fine Arts is pleased to present Echoes, a group show of works that are manifestations of loss curated by Alyssa Alexander and Celeste Kaufman. An echo, at its core, is a distant version of what it once was. A sound reverberates, then fades. It can be a haunting memory, or instill a sense of wonder. An echo can also be a reminiscence, a nod to something that came before it. The present echoes the past. It is not a perfect replication of it, but an acknowledgement of its heritage. The works collected in this group show are echoes both in process and in concept. Their origins are transformed and concealed. The resulting piece appears to be its own entity, but still contains whispers of how it began. There is a loss of form, color, or imagery, but that does not detract from what remains. These artists are also investigating the loss of places, time, objects, and concepts as they create so that the work itself becomes an homage, an echo, to these distant sources. Peter Hoffers landscapes at first appear to be traditional serene and glossy representations of the world around us. However, upon stepping closer you discover that the paintings have drips and inconsistent marks, and the surfaces are scratched, cracked, and seared. He has manipulated them into different states of retrograde, as if they are antiquated works that have been abandoned and then uncovered. They carry a sense of nostalgia for both bygone times and the places that collect these kinds of memories, the attics and antique stores where you might stumble across an artifact akin to the one he has created. Sarah Irvins ink series reflects the shifting nature of memory, the evolution of language on an individual and societal level, and how the dependability of both can be lost over time. The series was initially inspired by her grandfathers loss of language due to Alzheimers disease, but developed further as she began to use the limited language skills of her baby daughter as a starting point, shifting her focus from the end of our relationship with words to the beginning. She begins with ink and non-absorbent Yupo paper, writing words in expressive cursive, then destroys those marks with squeegees, pulling the ink across the paper to form rich, dynamic new images. Remnants of the words sometimes remain visible, but their meaning cant be deciphered. Jeffrey Cortland Jones work is deceptively minimalist. A depth is revealed beyond the initial perception of monochromatic surfaces thats built up through layers of rich color. Jones is not creating white paintings he is pushing colors to their very limits, to the moment just before they become white. The under-painting peeks through here and there, giving a glimpse to the shades and textures that construct the final work. Its because of these hidden features that Jones considers himself something of a landscape painter, inspired by the grit and entropy of his urban surroundings. He draws qualities from the peeling layers of paint on concrete walls, the scratches left behind by skateboards on handrails, the flecks of metal that shine through as surfaces are eroded over time. The surfaces of his paintings are then not only the ghosts of the colors underneath, but of the largely abandoned industrial landscape. Ryan Sarah Murphy constructs reliefs from discarded cardboard. Finding her materials out on the street or in the remnants of her own consumerism, she removes any identifying branding, text, or images and uses whats left without painting or treating them. Murphy allows whats left to guide her, using its energy and unknown history to shape her decisions as she assembles them into forms that meet at the intersection of abstraction and architectural elements, suggesting a strange terrain seen from an aerial view. The gritty remnants of an urban landscape are revived as bold structures with a bright, limited palette and an alluring tactile nature an unexpected iteration of our societys odds and ends. Dana Oldfather begins her paintings by blocking in a scene from her Midwestern domestic life the discomfort she feels when caught in traditional roles for women and notions of femininity, the isolation and loneliness of motherhood, the fragility of comfort and happiness. Then, she obliterates that imagery through layers of ink, spray paint, acrylic, and oil paints. The narrative is masked by frenetic mark making that possesses a pulsing energy and bittersweet beauty. However, Oldfather does not seek to hide her interior life. She considers the chaos of her abstraction to be an honest addition to it.


The Wasp in the Garden
Jan 04-Feb 10
Kathryn Markel Fine Arts is pleased to present The Wasp in the Garden, Marilla Palmers third solo show with the gallery. There is an inextricable connection between nature and the work of Marilla Palmer in inspiration, process, and concept. Her mixed media pieces blur the distinction between the organic and artifice, using dried foliage and scavenged detritus alongside synthetic materials to enrich rendered paintings of branches and flowers. In Palmers studio, leaves and petals that have been gathered from her garden are pressed, wings are collected from dead insects, and mushrooms are gathered to make spore prints. These elements sneak into the work among drawn shadows of branches and watercolor florals, often nearly undetectable until after careful inspection. Then, Palmer brings a touch of glamour with lush fabrics, sequins, and glitter, adding a celebratory level of additional beauty. This juxtaposition is inspired by the nature paintings of the Rinpa school of the Edo period in Japan, particularly Sakai Hoitsus byobu paintings that combine botanical renderings with stylized abstracted rivers. Palmers latest work shows even more of an homage to the tradition, with pieces that show her plants grounded by their surroundings like a sparkling river, or on display in a vase. These vase paintings are also a nod to ikebana, the Japanese art of flower arrangement that favors minimal shapes, lines, and forms and emphasizes a delicate balance of the elements. Also included in the show are sculptures created from wasp nests, mirroring Palmers belief that wasps are the artists of the insect world. Considering their nests site specific architectural sculptures with chiaroscuro swirling patterns, she uses their abandoned creations as raw material to mold around mannequins, resulting in surreal human forms. Marilla Palmer lives and works in Brooklyn, NY and has shown extensively throughout the United States. Her work has been exhibited at the Brooklyn Museum, Brooklyn Academy of Music, Carlsbad Museum and Art Center, and MoMA PS1, among other galleries and institutions. She received her B.F.A from the Philadelphia College of Art.


The Hot House
Jan 04-Feb 10
Kathryn Markel Fine Arts is pleased to present The Hot House, a group show curated by Marilla Palmer. Marilla Palmer has curated The Hot House in conjunction with her show, The Wasp in the Garden. Complementing her exhibition of mixed media botanical works, this group of artists represents a range of ways art is used to study, celebrate, and engage with nature. Not only are they inspired by nature as a whole, specific elements of nature are brought into their studios to be photographed, rendered, or used as raw materials. This intimacy, admiration, and protectiveness of these pieces of nature is reflected in the work, whether through traditional drawings or contemporary abstraction. These works are exemplary of the shift in focus from the paintings of the Hudson River School that revered nature as sublime to humankinds modern combative relationship with it. We are a threat, and nature as we know it is unsustainable. Botanical art has always recognized the ephemerality of the natural world, but now it has the emotional weight of investigating our role in that risk, and our responsibility to the natural world of protecting it. Representing nature in art may be the only way to save it. LC Armstrong paints imaginary landscapes with brilliant colors and shifts of scale, giving them a Surrealist atmosphere. Flowers in the foreground loom over magical realist scenes, glowing with an inherent luminosity built up with her layers of paint. Susanna Bauer works with found natural objects and embellishes them with crochet. There is a tension of fragility and strength in her sculptural pieces the piercing of a brittle leaf threatens it, yet it becomes both strengthened by the final construction and elevated beyond its initial state of overlooked decay. Blond Jenny explores an intimate, even erotic, relationship to nature in her decoupage using organic materials. While florals have long been a stand-in for sexuality, her work is more explicit in its imagery. Katie DeGroot strives to represent trees as they are how they grow to survive and adapt to their given environment, producing contorted abstract limbs rather than how they are typically depicted in their idealized symmetrical forms. While her paintings are grounded by observation, she lends her own interpretation of their personality by imbuing them with abstracted details. Beverley Duncan s traditional, nearly scientific, botanical drawings represent her observations of the flora and fauna in her immediate surroundings. Each piece is rooted in a specific time and place and celebrates the interconnectedness of the natural world. Alexis Rockman paints future landscapes that depict the threat of climate change and genetic engineering, should they be allowed to continue unimpeded. He considers his work to be Pop Art, but with natural history as his iconography. Katia Santibanezs geometric abstraction is inspired by the fundamental elements of nature, as well as its connections to the complementary worlds of architecture and cityscapes. Organized by grids, her paintings incorporate ideas of order and power, structure and balance, chaos and control. Fred Tomaselli creates mesmerizing patterns meticulously crafted from organic matter, pharmaceuticals, street drugs, printed materials, and hand-painted elements suspended in layers of resin. While calling to mind ancient natural artifacts trapped in amber, the hallucinatory aspect of his imagery grounds his pieces in a contemporary world. Esther Traugot calls her hand-crocheted coverings of natural objects bandages or cozies because, while they obscure the object itself, they are also an attempt to preserve nature and prevent its decay. They add a sense of humanity to the objects, and bridges the gap between nature and artifice. Denise Walser-Kolars watercolor paintings savor the minute details of each botanical specimen they portray. Attention paid to the subtle nuance of color relishes in the natural beauty around us. Natalie Colette Woods piece from her installation, Swallowed By Nature, examines the relationships between home, nature, and urban environments. The foundation of her sculptures are found objects that are then overcome by natural materials like moss, succulents, and air plants to show nature reclaiming the manmade world.


The Hot House
Jan 04-Feb 10
Kathryn Markel Fine Arts is pleased to present The Hot House, a group show curated by Marilla Palmer. Marilla Palmer has curated The Hot House in conjunction with her show, The Wasp in the Garden. Complementing her exhibition of mixed media botanical works, this group of artists represents a range of ways art is used to study, celebrate, and engage with nature. Not only are they inspired by nature as a whole, specific elements of nature are brought into their studios to be photographed, rendered, or used as raw materials. This intimacy, admiration, and protectiveness of these pieces of nature is reflected in the work, whether through traditional drawings or contemporary abstraction. These works are exemplary of the shift in focus from the paintings of the Hudson River School that revered nature as sublime to humankinds modern combative relationship with it. We are a threat, and nature as we know it is unsustainable. Botanical art has always recognized the ephemerality of the natural world, but now it has the emotional weight of investigating our role in that risk, and our responsibility to the natural world of protecting it. Representing nature in art may be the only way to save it. LC Armstrong paints imaginary landscapes with brilliant colors and shifts of scale, giving them a Surrealist atmosphere. Flowers in the foreground loom over magical realist scenes, glowing with an inherent luminosity built up with her layers of paint. Susanna Bauer works with found natural objects and embellishes them with crochet. There is a tension of fragility and strength in her sculptural pieces the piercing of a brittle leaf threatens it, yet it becomes both strengthened by the final construction and elevated beyond its initial state of overlooked decay. Blond Jenny explores an intimate, even erotic, relationship to nature in her decoupage using organic materials. While florals have long been a stand-in for sexuality, her work is more explicit in its imagery. Katie DeGroot strives to represent trees as they are how they grow to survive and adapt to their given environment, producing contorted abstract limbs rather than how they are typically depicted in their idealized symmetrical forms. While her paintings are grounded by observation, she lends her own interpretation of their personality by imbuing them with abstracted details. Beverley Duncan s traditional, nearly scientific, botanical drawings represent her observations of the flora and fauna in her immediate surroundings. Each piece is rooted in a specific time and place and celebrates the interconnectedness of the natural world. Alexis Rockman paints future landscapes that depict the threat of climate change and genetic engineering, should they be allowed to continue unimpeded. He considers his work to be Pop Art, but with natural history as his iconography. Katia Santibanezs geometric abstraction is inspired by the fundamental elements of nature, as well as its connections to the complementary worlds of architecture and cityscapes. Organized by grids, her paintings incorporate ideas of order and power, structure and balance, chaos and control. Fred Tomaselli creates mesmerizing patterns meticulously crafted from organic matter, pharmaceuticals, street drugs, printed materials, and hand-painted elements suspended in layers of resin. While calling to mind ancient natural artifacts trapped in amber, the hallucinatory aspect of his imagery grounds his pieces in a contemporary world. Esther Traugot calls her hand-crocheted coverings of natural objects bandages or cozies because, while they obscure the object itself, they are also an attempt to preserve nature and prevent its decay. They add a sense of humanity to the objects, and bridges the gap between nature and artifice. Denise Walser-Kolars watercolor paintings savor the minute details of each botanical specimen they portray. Attention paid to the subtle nuance of color relishes in the natural beauty around us. Natalie Colette Woods piece from her installation, Swallowed By Nature, examines the relationships between home, nature, and urban environments. The foundation of her sculptures are found objects that are then overcome by natural materials like moss, succulents, and air plants to show nature reclaiming the manmade world.